In Winstone's imagination, the Kid and his partner ride through the Wild West on the trail of their quarry. In Winstone's actual life, he's had to abandon his 'partner' and is hiding out in the tough landscape of Central Otago.

 

What has this boy run from, and how will the resilient and engaging twelve-year-old survive?

 

 

This is a story of settling in a new land, of hardship, resilience and of love.



In 1866, Daniel Peterson and his family give up their comfortable life in London for an unseen farm on Banks Peninsula. Daniel plans to make a fortune growing grass-seed; until he does so, there can be no going back. But the realities of a remote hill country block are very different to the cosy imaginings of a clerk. The Petersons find themselves at the mercy of the land, the weather and their few neighbours - a motley, suspicious assortment of old whalers, escaped convicts, wary French settlers and true-blue Tory squatters. Even their own house has a secret to hide - that of its first inhabitant, the scandalous Etienne La Rochelle and his Maori lover. When Daniel's daughter Hester discovers La Rochelle's journal, it leads her on a journey of discovery - a path into a world of beauty, darkness and illicit love.

 

A rich and darkly funny novel about family history and the risk and power of knowledge.
 


I want to tell you a story about my mother, although of course it is also mine – inherited, along with dangly earlobes and a horror of deep water.'

 

Janine's mother had an obsession: her ancestry. What she uncovered was a colourful assortment of characters and their penchant for bad behaviour.

Startlingly original and superbly written, Tanya Moir's surprising new book asks how much we really want to know about our futures and our pasts.

 

 

This powerfully realised novel weaves the past with the present and the real with the imaginary to tell a moving, inventive and hard-hitting story that will remain with you long after you have finished the last page.